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Could Stress be the Key to Helping Prevent Teen Car Accidents in Homestead and Other Communities?

No parent wants their teen driver to stress behind the wheel and many of us see stress as a type of distraction. In fact, some safety experts argue that driving when we’re very upset is tantamount to driving distracted in Homestead or our communities. A new study published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, however, suggests that some stress could reduce the risk of car accidents for teen drivers.

According to the researchers at the University of Sherbrooke, teens with responsive stress systems may have a lower risk of car accidents. The study examined 42 teen drivers in Virginia to test their stress levels and their rate of crashes during their first 18 months of driving. Researchers found that teens who had higher levels of cortisol (a stress hormone) when stressed had fewer near-misses and collisions during the study than teens with less intense responses to stress. The study’s authors concluded that differences in biology could have an impact on how teens respond to problems and hazards in driving scenarios.

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Car accidents in Homestead
and other communities continue to be a leading cause of death and injury for teens. Can this newest study offer some insight that could help prevent traffic fatalities in Homestead and other communities? On the surface, of course, there is very little that can be done about a driver’s stress response. On the other hand, knowing that there are biological markers that affect driving ability could be useful. Parents who have teens who tend to stay anxious behind the wheel or teens who tend not to stay cool under pressure may be able to see from this study that this personality trait could affect driving ability.

For parents who want to help their teens avoid car and truck collisions in Homestead or their community, there are a few things that can be done:

•Get additional driving instruction for your teen. One-on-one driving instruction, racing classes, and additional classes can help new drivers develop skills and can also teach them to stay calmer in high-risk situations, which can lower their risk of accidents.

•Set rules about safe driving. Make it clear to your new driver that distracted driving or drunk driving are not allowed. Do not allow your teen to use cell phones behind the wheel – even hands-free devices – and make sure that your teen knows to call home for a ride rather than driving drunk.

•Emphasize defensive driving. Researchers in the most recent study concluded that driving ability and learning to drive are affected by biological markers, but getting your child into defensive driving classes can help your new driver learn how to prevent accidents, which can lower their risk overall.


Have you or a loved one been injured in a car crash in South Florida? Contact Flaxman Law Group for a free, no obligation case assessment. Flaxman Law Group is a full-service law firm with offices in Homestead, Hollywood, and Miami. Our attorneys have more than 60 years of combined legal experience and have already recovered more than $100 million on behalf of thousands of personal injury and car accident plaintiffs across the region. Contact us today; we would be happy to book your free consultation.