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What to Tell Your Teen Driver About Summer Driving

At this time of year, many teenagers are thrilled at the prospect of driving. If your teenager is new to driving, especially, he or she may be excited to get behind the wheel. Before they do, there are several subjects you will want to talk about to ensure your teen has the lowest risk of car collisions in Hollywood or your community.

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Choose  a relaxed time when you and your teen have plenty of time to talk. Approach the conversation as a mutual discussion. Your teen is more likely to listen if you ask questions and ask for their ideas about safe driving, too.

Subjects you will want to cover with your teen driver include:

1) Drinking and driving. While many teens know they shouldn’t drink and drive, it’s important to review this message often. Specifically, be sure you review what your teen can do if they should find themselves in a difficult position. In many cases, teens may feel uncomfortable calling parents for help because they fear punishment. Discuss options with your teen so they know they can call you or a family friend if they do find themselves in a difficult position. Remind them that virtually anything is better than drinking and driving. Make sure your teen has several options for avoiding drinking and driving.

2) Distraction. Many teens equate distracted driving with using handheld devices while in a car. It’s important to remind them that anything that takes their eyes off the road, their mind off of their driving, or their hands off the wheel counts is distracted driving. Your teen may not realize that talking to passengers, changing music, singing along to a favorite song or watching the scenery instead of driving can count as distraction. Talk to your teen and together create a list of all possible distractions in the car. Then, work together to come up with a list of ways your teen can avoid distraction while driving.

3) Fatigued driving. Teenagers need more sleep, but many of them lead such busy lives they don’t get enough rest. Fatigue can affect reaction times and driving ability. It can be especially deadly when combined with a teen driver’s relatively smaller amount of driving experience. If you notice your teenager is tired frequently, encourage them to visit a doctor. Help your teen with time management so they have enough time to sleep well.

4) Road trips. Road trips are a rite of passage and plenty of fun, but they also come with their own risks. For example, your teen may travel with friends in order to make the most of their vacation and this can lead to distraction. Your teen may also underestimate the driving skills they need on a road trip. If your teen is going on a road trip, discuss how to do so safely and help them come up with a route which includes plenty of breaks for rest.

5) Weather conditions. Hollywood and other parts of South Florida have unique weather and environmental hazards. Your teen, for example, may be driving in hot weather or glare. He or she may be driving through areas where wildlife is a concern. Heavy rains and strong winds can also be a risk on the roads. Discuss all the types of weather your teen may encounter while driving in Florida and review ways that they can stay safe.

If your teen is new to driving, getting them additional training with a professional instructor can help them learn how to drive defensively and safely. This can be a great option for the summer, when your teen may have a few extra hours to devote to their driving skills. In any case, reviewing the basics of driving and keeping you discussion about safety open can be an important way to ensure your teen has the tools they need to stay safe on the road.

If your child has been injured in a road traffic accident in Homestead, Hollywood or anywhere in South Florida, contact Flaxman Law Group for a free consultation. A Hollywood car accident attorney at Flaxman Law Group can review your situation and can help you determine what legal options you have.